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Masayuki Moriya

From Openwaterpedia
Masayuki Moriya was nominated for the 2016 WOWSA Awards, a recognition of outstanding men, women, performances and offerings around the globe sponsored by the World Open Water Swimming Association in the category of World Open Water Swimming Man of the Year
Japanese newspaper article about the 2015 crossings and personalities, including Masayuki Moriya, of the Tsugaru Channel in northern Japan
Masayuki Moriya after crossing the Tsugaru Channel from Honshu to Hokkaido
Ocean Navi relay members Chika Nishibori, Kumiko Koizumi, Minori Tanaka, Syuji Nao, Hiroko Minami, Rie Tamai, Yuki Tsunoda, Tomoko Tamura, Syusei Uzawa and Kenji Kambe with observer Masayuki Moriya and crew member Honma Motoko after crossing the 19.5 km Tsugaru Channel in 15 hours 16 minutes 17 seconds on 21 October 2020

Moriya Masayuki (守谷 雅之) (born 18 April 1967) is a Japanese ocean swimmer and guide from Tokyo. He founded Ocean Navi in Tokyo, Japan in 2008 and Channel Swim Japan.

Swimming Highlights

  • He crossed the Tsugaru Channel between Japan's main island of Honshu and its northernmost island of Hokkaido in 11 hours 55 minutes in August 2011.
  • He had previously crossed the Tsugaru Channel in 2008 and 2009 as part of a relay team that was televised throughout Japan.

Coaching

Moriya also was the coach and navigator for a young blind swimmer and relays across the Tsugaru Channel as well as the Japanese administrator of the Tsugaru Channel Swimming Association [see list below). He coached Team Ocean-navi #1 6-person relay to the world relay record (wetsuit) on 11 July 2013 in 6 hours 44 minutes and the Team Ocean-navi #2 4-person relay team to a 13 hour 41 minute crossing on 15 July 2013.

He has organized 112 Tsugaru Channel swims to date with the organization of his first relay attempt held in 2008 with Team24 TV relay. The sextet swam for 11 hours 56 minutes, but ultimately did not finish that year.

Tsugaru Channel Career Highlights

1. Team24 TV relay (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 11 hours 56 minutes on 31 August 2008
2. Team24 TV relay (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 12 hours 23 minutes on 30 August 2009
3. Masayuki Moriya (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 13 hours 40 minutes on 16 August 2010 (43 years)
4. Masayuki Moriya (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 11 hours 55 minutes on 22 August 2011 (44 years)
5. Darren Miller (USA), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 15 hours 55 minutes on 10 July 2012
6. Stephen Redmond (Ireland), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 5 hours 29 minutes on 13 July 2012 (47 years)
7. Stephen Redmond (Ireland), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 14 hours 32 minutes on 14 July 2012 (47 years)
8. Team Ocean Navi relay (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 9 hours 38 minutes on 24 July 2012
9. Team Umio relay (Japan), Hokkaido-to-Honshu, DNF on 23 August 2012
10. Kenichi Setsumasa (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 7 hours 30 minutes on 8 September 2012 (24 years)
11. Team Umidama relay (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 15 hours 23 minutes on 22 September 2012
12. Brad Allen McVetta (USA), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 17 hours 13 minutes on 1 July 2013 (40 years)
13. Team Ocean Navi relay (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 6 hours 44 minutes on 12 July 2013
14. Team Ocean Navi relay (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 13 hours 41 minutes on 14 July 2013
15. Team Umio relay (Japan), Hokkaido-to-Honshu, 12 hours 45 minutes on 30 July 2013
16. Team Hachinobe relay (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 6 hours 50 minutes on 1 August 2013
17. Adam Walker (UK), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 15 hours 31 minutes on 12 August 2013 (35 years)
18. Yesenia Cabrera Fuegos (Guatemala), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 13 hours 17 minutes on 14 August 2013 (40 years)
19. Team Kizuna relay (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 6 hours 40 minutes on 23 August 2013
20. Chris Kraus + Brian Ross + Rick Gaenzle relay (USA), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 9 hours 11 minutes on 10 September 2013
21. Mo Siegel (USA), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 11 hours 30 minutes on 12 September 2013
22. Santosh Manohar Patil (India), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 5 hours 0 minutes on 24 September 2013 (25 years)
23. Kimberley Chambers (New Zealand), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 9 hours 38 minutes on 3 July 2014 (37 years)
24. Team Okuda relay (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 9 hours 9 minutes on 16 July 2014
25. Attila Mányoki (Hungary), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 7 hours 29 minutes on 9 August 2014 (40 years)
26. Team Ocean Navi relay (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 13 hours 44 minutes on 21 August 2014
27. Chitose Okugami (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNS on 1 September 2014 (46 years)
28. Team Hachinobe relay (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 9 hours 51 minutes on 15 September 2014
29. Dr. Steven Minaglia (USA), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNS on 1 September 2014 (41 years)
30. James Penrose (UK), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 15 hours 7 minutes 40 seconds on 8 July 2015 (63 years)
31. Guy Moar (UK), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 6 hours 0 minutes on 9 July 2015 (47 years)
32. Stephen Junk (Australia), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 1 hour 47 minutes 42 seconds on 7 August 2015
33. Chitose Okugami (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 4 hours 1 minute on 9 August 2015 (47 years)
34. Dr. Steven Minaglia (USA), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 1 hour 47 minutes on 20 September 2015 (42 years)
35. Guy Moar (UK), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 11 hours 32 minutes 41 seconds on 21 August 2015 (48 years)
36. Team Uminchu relay (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 13 hours 33 minutes 24 seconds on 5 September 2015
37. Daniel Curtis (USA), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 13 hours 39 minutes 10 seconds on 7 September 2015 (49 years)
38. Rohan More (India), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 10 hours 37 minutes 45 seconds on 14 September 2015
39. Antonio Argüelles (Mexico), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 12 hours 38 minutes 26 seconds on 15 September 2015 (56 years)
40. Motoko Honma (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 13 hours 26 minutes 44 seconds on 22 July 2016 (41 years)
41. Team Yajyu relay (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 13 hours 11 minutes 11 seconds on 25 July 2016
42. Team Kaikyooudanbu relay (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 9 hours 18 minutes 31 seconds on 7 September 2016
43. Boguslaw Ogrodnik (Poland), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNS on 10 August 2016 (51 years)
44. Abhejali Bernardova (Czech Republic), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 11 hours 7 minutes 58 seconds on 12 August 2016 (39 years)
45. Stephen Junk (Australia), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 11 hours 2 minutes 23 seconds on 19 August 2016 (55 years)
46. Honoka Hasegawa (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 8 hours 31 minutes 17 seconds on 24 August 2016 (18 years)
47. Toshio Tominaga (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 9 hours 58 minutes 16 seconds on 7 September 2016 (73 years)
48. Mariel Hawley Dávila (Mexico), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 4 hours 46 minutes 27 seconds on 28 September 2016 (47 years)
49. Beth French (UK), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 7 hours 8 minutes 13 seconds on 3 July 2017 (39 years)
50. Brad McVetta (USA), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 9 hours 0 minutes on 5 July 2017 (44 years)
51. Ion Lazarenco Tiron (Moldava/Ireland), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 11 hours 20 minutes 21 seconds on 25 July 2017 (39 years)
52. Jorge Crivilles Villanueva (Spain), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 8 hours 29 minutes 47 seconds on 27 July 2017 (46 years)
53. Hiroko Ashikawa (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNS on 7 August 2017 (25 years)
54. Paul Every (Australia), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNS on 9 August 2017 (53 years)
55. Team Basic (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNS on 14 August 2017
56. Claire Wilson (UK), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNS on 16 August 2018 (48 years)
57. Adrian Sarchet (Guernsey), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 14 hours 2 minutes 0 seconds on 29 August 2017 (42 years)
58. Union Dine relay, Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 10 hours 28 minutes 0 seconds on 31 August 2017
59. Boguslaw Ogrodnik (Poland), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 12 hours 15 minutes 51 seconds on 4 September 2017 (52 years)
60. Team Redbear’s relay (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 13 hours 32 minutes 0 seconds on 6 September 2017
61. Prabhat Koli (India), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 9 hours 52 minutes 0 seconds on 11 September 2017 (18 seconds)
62. Team Gotenyama Triathlon (Japan), Honshu, DNS on 13 September 2017
63. Zdenka Krčálová (Czech Republic), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 9 hours 52 minutes on 18 September 2017 (32 years)
64. Thomas Pembroke (Australia), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 11 hours 12 minutes on 20 September 2017 (28 years)
65. Ryan Utsumi (USA), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 8 hours 28 minutes on 21 June 2018 (33 years)
66. Cameron Bellamy (South Africa), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 11 hours 7 minutes 31 seconds on 21 June 2018 (33 years)
67. Mariel Hawley Dávila (Mexico) and Nora Toledano (Mexico), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 6 hours 20 minutes 52 seconds on 1 July 2018
68. Matías Ola (Argentina), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 3 hours 21 minutes on 9 July 2018 (33 years)
69. Dean Summers (Australia), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 12 hours 31 minutes 8 seconds on 9 July 2018 (58 years)
70. Andre Wiersig (Germany), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 12 hours 55 minutes 53 seconds on 11 July 2018 (46 years)
71. Andrew Hunt (Australia), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 10 hours 52 minutes 22 seconds on 19 July 2018 (57 years)
72. Tomonari Ogino (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 12 hours 5 minutes 50 seconds on 19 July 2018 (41 years)
73. Aleisha Riboldi, Lisa Batey]], Youri Lavoine]] relay (Australia), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 18 hours 29 minutes 42 seconds on 20 July 2018
74. Team Hirayama-kaneidan (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 13 hours 16 minutes 53 seconds on 30 July 2018
75. Joelle Beard (USA), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 3 hours 51 minutes on 31 July 2018 (30 years)
76. Thomas Pembroke (Australia), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 15 hours 1 minute 30 seconds on 10 August 2018 (29 years)
77. Nathalie Pohl (Germany), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNS on 12 August 2018 (23 years)
78. Lynton Mortensen (Australia), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 9 hours 34 minutes 15 seconds on 14 August 2018 (54 years)
79. Matthias Kaßner (Germany), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 3 hours 28 minutes on 18 August 2018 (50 years)
80. Masaki Sugita (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 13 hours 18 minutes 43 seconds on 19 August 2018 (40 years)
81. Team 63 (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 10 hours 30 minutes on 21 August 2018
82. Dean Summers (Australia), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 9 hours 43 minutes on 31 August 2018 (58 years)
83. Team Sharks relay (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 10 hours 30 minutes on 21 August 2018
84. Denise Underwood, Enda Sinnott, James O’Connor, Peter Bolger, Sandra Goldsmith, Saskia Dodebier (Ireland), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNS on 3 September 2018
85. Simon Olliver (New Zealand), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 11 hours 58 minutes 11 seconds on 11 September 2018 (54 years)
86. Boguslaw Ogrodnik (Poland), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 12 hours 30 minutes on 20 September 2018 (54 years)
87. Herman van der Westhuizen (South Africa), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 12 hours on 20 September 2018 (52 years)
88. James Penrose (UK), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 12 hours on 10 July 2019 (67 years)
89. Amy Hayes (USA), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 2 hours on 10 July 2019 (35 years)
90. Martyn Webster (UK), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNS on 11 July 2019 (52 years)
91. Dean Summers (Australia), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNS on 11 July 2019 (59 years)
92. Takamasa Kojima (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 3 hours on 19 July 2019 (45 years)
93. Jonathan Ratcliffe (UK), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 11 hours 14 minutes 53 seconds on 19 July 2019 (45 years)
94. Team Mongolian Chop relay (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 7 hours 53 minutes on 20 July 2019
95. Claire Faranda (France), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 9 hours 51 minutes 24 seconds on 20 July 2019 (29 years)
96. Marty Filipowski] (Australia), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 13 hours 19 minutes 45 seconds on 28 July 2019 (55 years)
97. Matías Ola (Argentina), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 12 hours 55 minutes 25 seconds on 28 July 2019 (34 years)
98. Kieron Palframan (South Africa), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNS on 31 July 2019 (45 years)
99. Team Denise relay with Enda, James, Peter, Sandra, Saskia (Ireland), Honshu, DNS on 31 July 2019
100. Nathalia Pohl (Germany), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 10 hours 9 minutes 40 seconds on 5 August 2019 (24 years)
101. Kieron Palframan (South Africa), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 8 hours 49 minutes 5 seconds on 5 August 2019 (45 years)
102. Team Denise relay with Enda, James, Peter, Sandra, Saskia (Ireland), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 16 hours 37 minutes 45 seconds on 6 August 2019
103. Team Basic relay (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 11 hours 49 minutes on 11 August 2019
104. Marcia Cleveland (USA), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 10 hours 11 minutes 2 seconds on 19 August 2019 (53 years)
105. Dina Levačič (Croatia), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 7 hours 13 minutes 15 seconds on 19 August 2019 (23 years)
106. Matthias Kaßner (Germany), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 9 hours 45 minutes on 21 August 2019 (51 years)
107. Emre Erdogan (Turkey), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 16 hours 17 minutes on 21 August 2019 (36 years)
108. Team Ashiko (Japan), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 10 hours 48 minutes 17 seconds on 30 August 2019
109. Luca Pozzi (Italy), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 8 hours 20 minutes 58 seconds on 30 August 2019 (34 years)
110. Herman van der Westhuizen (South Africa), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, 10 hours 22 minutes 37 seconds on 31 August 2019 (53 years)
111. Edie Hu (USA), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 11 hours 33 minutes on 11 September 2019 (44 years)
112. Dean Summers (Australia), Honshu-to-Hokkaido, DNF after 5 hours 2 minutes on 11 September 2019 (59 years)

Sado Channel Career Highlights

1. Oceans Seven relay, 10 hours 50 minutes on June 21st 2010 (6 swimmers)
2. Ocean Navi team relay, 15 hours 10 minutes on June 21st 2010 (12 swimmers)
3. Ocean Navi team relay, 13 hours 13 minutes on June 18th 2013 (11 swimmers)
4. Ocean Navi team relay, 16 hours 35 minutes on June 18th 2014 (12 swimmers)
5. Ocean Navi team relay, 13 hours 34 minutes on June 25th 2010 (10 swimmers)
6. Team Basic relay, 16 hours 18 minutes 55 seconds on June 24th 2015 (17 swimmers)
7. Kaikyo Oden team relay, 10 hour 50 minutes on June 10th 2015 (10 swimmers)
8. Team Basic relay, 13 hours 1 minute on June 8th 2016 (10 swimmers)
9. Ocean Navi relay, DNF on June 21st 2010 (13 swimmers)
10. XAIBATTS team relay, 11 hours 31 minutes 21 seconds on May 30th 2018 (9 swimmers)
11. Ocean Navi relay, 13 hours 7 minutes 4 seconds on June 13th 2018 (9 swimmers)
12. Ocean Navi relay, 12 hours 24 minutes on June 12th 2019 (12 swimmers)

2019 World Open Water Swimming Man of the Year Nomination

Moriya was nominated for the 2019 World Open Water Swimming Man of the Year award with the following nomination:

Japanese live in an island nation that stretches from the tropical paradise of Okinawa to its northerly prefecture of Hokkaido surrounded by the northern Pacific. Masayuki Moriya works year-round, traveling from north to south, east to west, traversing the entire nation while sharing his passion for open water swimming as a coach, race director, safety officer, channel swimming crew member, blogger, administrator, videographer, and swimming holiday leader. He teaches newcomers including elderly masters swimmers, and helps organize domestic national championships for elite Japanese athletes - and is planning for the 2020 Tokyo Olympic marathon swim. For personally guiding, observing and organizing 21 solo and relay swims from 15 countries across the Tsugaru Channel and Sado Channel in northern Japan this year, for administering open water events with the Japanese Coast Guard and other relevant authorities, for his steady leadership of the sport in Japan, Masayuki Moriya is a worthy nominee for the 2016 World Open Water Swimming Man of the Year.

2016 World Open Water Swimming Man of the Year nomination

Moriya was nominated for the 2016 World Open Water Swimming Man of the Year by the World Open Water Swimming Association. His nomination reads,

Japanese live in an island nation that stretches from the tropical paradise of Okinawa to its northerly prefecture of Hokkaido surrounded by the northern Pacific. Masayuki Moriya travels from north to south, east to west, traversing the entire nation while sharing his passion for open water swimming as a coach, race director, safety officer, channel swimming crew member, blogger, administrator and swimming holiday leader. He teaches newcomers including elderly masters swimmers and helps organize domestic championships for elite Japanese athletes. For his deep heartfelt love of open water swimming that he genuinely espouses in all his activities, for his leadership of the sport in the island nation of Japan, for his patience and investment of time and energy to help develop the sport in the Far East, Masayuki Moriya is a worthy nominee for the 2016 World Open Water Swimming Man of the Year.

守谷雅之

● 生年月日: 1967/4/18 ● 血液型: A型(O型じゃないの?とよくいわれます) ● 出身地: 神奈川県 ● 在住: 神奈川県相模原市

担当レッスン又はイベント

担当レッスン又はイベント
レッツスイム新代田
Basic
海の練習会

資格・特技・趣味

資格・特技・趣味
日本水泳連盟OWS委員
文部科学大臣認定水泳C級教師
NPO法人日本災害救護推進協議会JAEA理事
JAEA水難救護員養成指導員・救命救急法指導員
小型船舶1級
小型船舶特殊

年/大会目/種目/順位

  • 1999 第2回ラフウォータースイムinヨロン 5km 総合優勝
  • 2000 第3回ラフウォータースイムinヨロン 5km 総合優勝
  • 2001 第1回ラフウォータースイムin座間味 5km 男子優勝
  • 2001 第2回金田湾マラソンスイミング大会 4.4km 総合優勝
  • 2001 第7回城ヶ島ロングディスタンススイミング大会 6km 優勝
  • 2002 第2回ラフウォータースイムin座間味 5km 総合優勝
  • 2002 第1回熱海曽我浦オーシャンスイムレース 3km 男子優勝
  • 2002 第3回金田湾マラソンスイミング大会 5km 総合優勝
  • 2002 第8回城ヶ島ロングディスタンススイミング大会 6km 優勝
  • 2003 第9回城ヶ島ロングディスタンススイミング大会 6km 優勝
  • 2003 第4回金田湾マラソンスイミング大会 5km 総合優勝
  • 2004 ラフウォータースイムin座間味2004 5km 総合優勝
  • 2004 第5回金田湾マラソンスイミング大会 5km 総合優勝
  • 2005 ラフウォータースイムinひらつか 800m×3 総合優勝 
  • 2007 御宿オーシャンレース 800m×3 優勝 

主な過去の栄光や記録(年月・大会名・順位)または目標・希望

2008年・2009年に日本テレビで放映された24時間テレビ『津軽海峡縦断リレー』ではスイムアドバイザーを務め、盲目の少女スイマーのナビゲーター(伴泳)としても活躍。チームを津軽海峡縦断完泳へと導きました。 『おんじゅくオーシャンスイムレース、松崎オーシャンスイムレースなどでレースディレクターもつとめています。』

個人HPやブログ・Twitterなど

校長先生の一言  『レッスン中の出来事など、感じたことを思いつきで書いています。写真コーナーもあるので一度遊びにいらして下さい。』 http://twitter.com/ocean_navi  その日の練習内容の予告!ポイント!スケジュール!イベントなど手軽に確認ができますよ!ぜひフォローをお願いします。 春に花咲く長距離クロール (月刊スイムの運営する swim.net にて動画で説明しています。)  長距離をいかにラクに泳ぐか?の極意を説明しています。2ビートクロールをマスターしたい人必見!

参加者へのアドバイス

とにかく海に行ったらまず自分自身が楽しんじゃいます。自分が楽しくなければみんなを楽しませることはできないと思ってますから・・・。海で遊ぶ(泳ぐ)ことなら何でもお任せ!遠い昔ですが学生時代には競泳1500m・400m・200mの選手として全国大会に出場したりライフガードなども経験しました。水泳の指導をするようになって気が付いたらもうすぐ25年。水泳の指導は全般的にできますよ!でも特に長距離クロールとオーシャンスイムの指導には独自のこだわりを持ってます。楽しいレッスンを心掛けているのでぜひ私のレッスンに一度参加してみてください!

Tsugaru Channel Videos



Video of Brad McVetta crossing the Tsugaru Channel courtesy of Masayuki Moriya of Ocean-navi and the Tsugaru Channel Swimming Association



Video of Mo Siegel crossing the Tsugaru Channel courtesy of Masayuki Moriya of Ocean-navi and the Tsugaru Channel Swimming Association


Video of Chris Kraus, Rick Gaenzle and Brian Ross relay crossing of the Tsugaru Channel courtesy of Masayuki Moriya of Ocean-navi and the Tsugaru Channel Swimming Association


Ryan Utsumi crossing the Tsugaru Channel courtesy of Masayuki Moriya of Ocean-navi and the Tsugaru Channel Swimming Association on 20 June 2018.


Cameron Bellamy completing the Oceans Seven challenge with an 11 hour 7 minute crossing of the Tsugaru Channel on 20 June 2018.


Nora Toledano and Mariel Hawley completing a record-setting tandem swim across the Tsugaru Channel in 6 hours 20 minutes on 2 July 2018.

Ocean Navi In Dogashima, Izu Peninsula


Led by Masayuki Moriya of Ocean Navi


Led by Masayuki Moriya of Ocean Navi

Ocean Navi Relay of Sado Channel

Hiroko Kasahara, Noriko Kimura, Kumiko Koizumi, Maki Sakamoto, Daisuke Tanaka, Mayumi Doi, Rei Yamazaki, Motoko Honma, and Masayuki Moriya completed a 13 hour 40 minute 40 km crossing of the Sado Channel on 7 June 2016.

Sado Island to Honshu


Ocean Navi team of Kumiko Koizumi, Masamichi Taniuchi, Tamotsu Yoshida, Noriko Kawasaki, Minori Tanaka, Takaomi Modegi, Yukie Makino, Terumi Nakayama and Satoko Murata completed a relay crossing of the Sado Channel from Sado Island to the Japanese mainland of Honshu in 13 hours 7 minutes 4 seconds on 13 June 2018.

Greatest Watermen in Open Water Swimming History

He was named as one of the Greatest Watermen in Open Water Swimming History by the World Open Water Swimming Association in 2015:

1. Zacharias Alexandrakis (Macedonia): Marathon swimming enthusiast, open water swimming promoter, lifeguard, swimming coach and lifesaving leader.
2. Antonio Argüelles Díaz-González (Mexico): Triathlete, ultra-endurance athlete, channel swimmer and author
3. Stathis Avramidis, Ph.D. (Greece): Researcher, swimmer, author, speaker, and lecturer
4. Peter Bales (South Africa): Channel swimmer, marathon swimmer, governing body administrator and escort pilot
5. Vito Bialla (U.S.A.): Extreme relay swimmer, professional sailor, and escort pilot of the Farallon Islands, California
6. Paul Blackbeard (South Africa): World-class pool swimmer, ocean swimmer, and life saver
7. Lord Byron (Great Britain): Poet, author and pioneering sea swimmer
8. Dick Campion (Australia): Olympian, coach, trainer, author, promoter, and professional marathon swimmer
9. Daniel Eulogio Carpio Massioti (Peru): Four-time Olympian, Channel swimmer, professional racer, and solo swimmer
10. Bruckner Chase (U.S.A.): marathon swimmer, ocean advocate, ambassador to the disabled, filmmaker, paddler and surf lifesaver
11. Buster Crabbe (U.S.A.): Olympic champion, ice swimmer, promoter, and movie star of 3 pulp fiction heroes
12. Guy Delage (France): Ocean swimmer, extreme adventurer, diver, submariner, and sailor
13. Marcos Díaz (Dominican Republic): Marathon racer, extreme swimmer, surfer, governing body administrator, and event director
14. Shannon Eckstein (Australia): Ironman lifesaver, paddler, kayaker, surf skier and ocean swimmer
15. Ian Emberson (Kauai, U.S.A.): Channel swimmer, original Ironman triathlete, ocean swimmer, event director, and triathlete
16. George Freeth (Hawai, U.S.A.): Ocean swimmer, surfer, paddler, and lifesaver organizer
17. Alfréd Hajós (Hungary): Olympic champion, professional racer, and architect
18. Trevor Hendy (Australia): Ironman lifesaver, paddler, kayaker, surf skier and ocean swimmer
19. Colin Hill (Great Britain): Ice swimmer, Channel swimmer, television commentator, and event director
20. Craig Hummer (U.S.A.): Competitive swimmer, kayaker, paddler, Ironman lifesaver, and Olympic television commentator
21. Ky Hurst (Australia): Ocean swimmer, two-time Olympian, body surfer extraordinaire, and champion life saver
22. Zhang Jian (China): Marathon swimmer, Channel swimmer, ice swimmer and university sports director
23. Captain Tim Johnson (U.S.A.): Marathon swimmer, author, professor, shark cage designer, analyst, and historian
24. Duke Kahanamoku (Hawaii): Ocean swimmer, Olympic champion, surfing legend and ambassador of aloha
25. Grant Kenny (Australia): Ironman lifesaver, paddler, kayaker, surf skier and ocean swimmer
26. Guy Leech (Australia): Ironman lifesaver, paddler, kayaker, surf skier and ocean swimmer
27. Luiz Eduardo Carneiro da Silva de Souza Lima (Brazil): Two-time Olympian, stand-up paddler, ocean swimming coach, pioneering ocean swimmer and promoter
28. Pádraig Mallon (Ireland): Marathon swimmer, Channel swimmer, ice swimmer, event organizer, promoter and triathlete
29. Vojislav Mijić (Serbia): Marathon swimmer, professional racer, solo pioneer and event organizer
30. Masayuki Moriya (Japan): Coach, channel swimmer, event organizer, clinician, and governing body administrator
31. Keo Nakama (Hawaii/U.S.A.): World champion, world record holder, pioneering ocean swimmer, event organizer and coach
32. Aaron Peirsol (U.S.A.): 7-time Olympic medalist, surfer, lifeguard, coach, and body surfer extraordinaire
33. Lewis Pugh (Great Britain): Channel swimmer, marathon swimmer, ocean advocate, ambassador, author, and speaker
34. Kevin Richards (South Africa): Competitive swimmer, triathlete, surf lifesaver, and coach
35. Philip Rush (New Zealand): Channel swimmer, marathon swimmer, professional racer, escort pilot, channel administrator, and fire fighter
36. Wayne Riddin (South Africa): Competitive swimmer, race director, aquapreneur, coach and promoter
37. Veljko Rogošić (Croatia): Two-time Olympic swimmer, professional racer, solo pioneer, swimming ambassador and marathon swimmer
38. Kenny Rust (Hawaii, U.S.A.): Ocean swimmer, lifeguard, aquapreneur, and event safety official
39. Ori Sela (Israel): Sea swimmer, coach, therapist, pioneer relay swimmer and aquapreneur
40. Borut Strel (Slovenia): Coach, swimmer, clinician, planner and logistic expert
41. Martin Strel (Slovenia): Channel swimmer, marathon swimmer, extreme adventurer, film protagonist, and camp clinician
42. Georgios-Ioannis Tsianos, M.D., Ph.D. (Greece): Research scientist, physician, expedition medic and Channel swimmer
43. Christof Wandratsch (Germany): Channel swimmer, professional racer, solo pioneer, ice swimming record holder and event promoter
44. Captain Matthew Webb (Great Britain): Channel swimmer, extreme adventurer, and professional racer
45. Johnny Weissmuller (U.S.A.): 4-time Olympic champion and movie star with a household name
46. Alick Wickham (Solomon Islands): Ocean swimmer, high diver, body surfing promoter, surfboard shaper, and freestyle ambassador
47. Patrick Winkler (Brazil): Competitive swimmer, ocean swimmer, stand-up paddler, race promoter and publisher of The Swim Channel Magazine
48. Jabez Wolffe (Great Britain): Channel aspirant and coach in the early generations of channel swimming
49. Doug Woodring (Hong Kong/U.S.A.): Marine environment ambassador, ecology advocate, aquapreneur, ocean event director, paddler, diver, and ocean swimmer
50. David Yudovin (U.S.A.): Channel swimmer, marathon swimmer, aquapreneur, benefactor and mariner

Yakabi Island Swim Picnic

The Yakabi Island Swim Picnic (屋嘉比島スイムピクニック in Japanese) is an swim excursion and swimming holiday organized by Moriya in Japan's Okinawa Prefecture that includes a 6.6 km circumnavigation swim of the uninhabited island of Yakabijima (屋嘉比島) that sits in the Kerama Island chain.

Sado Channel Crossing


by Channel Swim Japan

Enoshima - Jogashima Channel Crossing


by Channel Swim Japan

International Swim across La Perouse Channel

He participated in the International Swim across La Perouse Channel, a 42 km ocean swim between Sakhalin, Russia and Hokkaido, Japan across La Pérouse Strait or the Sōya Strait, a strait dividing the southern part of the Russian island of Sakhalin from the northern part of the Japanese island of Hokkaidō that connects the Sea of Japan on the west with the Sea of Okhotsk on the east in July 2019.

La Pérouse Strait is a strait is 42 km (26 miles) long and 40 to 140m (130 to 460 feet) deep. The narrowest part of the strait is in the west between Russia's Cape Krillion and Japan's Cape Soya. The strait is named after Jean-François de Galaup, comte de Lapérouse, who explored it in 1787.

External links