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Where The Crazy People Swim: Outrageous goals, failure, and success

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Steve Walker's book Where The Crazy People Swim: Outrageous goals, failure, and success, released in October 2016
Steve Walker approaching Scotland on his 11 hour 19 minute crossing of the North Channel

Where The Crazy People Swim: Outrageous goals, failure, and success is a book authored by Steve Walker, released in October 2016.

Donations[edit]

All profits from Where Do the Crazy People Swim will be donated to Zanmi Lakay, an organization that helps street kids in Haiti, including providing kids with scholarships to schools, meals, computer and photography classes (using gently used computers and cameras), and help in setting up businesses. The organization relies entirely on donations, and 100% of donated funds go to helping the kids.

Summary[edit]

Cold-water ultra-marathon swimming is about as tough as it gets. When looking at swims, you ask if anyone has done it, if there are jellyfish, and if anyone has died trying it. On most swims, failure is more likely than success. What drives a person to swim long distances in cold water? Why attempt something could kill you? Where the Crazy People Swim lays bare the mind of a swimmer who honestly and candidly describes his fears, his motivations, and his ultimate goal—not only in swimming, but in life. While covered by a veneer of swimming and honesty about failure both in the water and out, this book is about setting outrageous goals and the definition of success.

Steve Walker[edit]

Steve Walker is an American channel swimmer from California. He is an open water swimming coach and an American open water swimmer who has completed 4 of the 7 Oceans Seven channels. He completed an ice mile in 2.7°C (37°F) water in 1996 in Melbourne, Australia. He completed a crossing of the English Channel on 19 July 1996 in 13 hours 31 minutes from England to France, a crossing of the Strait of Gibraltar in 3 hours 59 minutes in 2015, a crossing of the Catalina Channel in 12 hours 14 minutes in 2015, a crossing of the North Channel on 14 August 2016 in 11 hours 19 minutes in 54°F water, and attempted a crossing of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and was pulled out after 4 hours 26 minutes and 10.8 miles in 46°F (7.7°F) water.

External links[edit]