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Oceans Seven

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(Redirected from Ocean's Seven)
Stephen Redmond in the Red Bull Bulletin, subject of the film Defeating Oceans Seven about his quest of the Oceans Seven, produced by Red Bull Media House
Adrian Sarchet of Guernsey doing a 17 hour 24 minute crossing of the Molokai Channel on 11 July 2016 under the escort of Captain Michael Twigg-Smith, escort kayaker Jeff Kozlovich, and support crew Pete Rowland and Mandy Mackelworth on Sarchet's fifth Oceans Seven channel swim
Steve Haumschild (paddler) with Antonio Argüelles Díaz-González on 22 March 2016 after a 23 hour 18 minute crossing of the Molokai Channel and paddler Jeff Kozlovich on Sandy Beach, Oahu, Hawaii
Anna-Carin Nordin swimming across the North Channel to become the first woman and the second individual to complete the Oceans Seven
Locations of the Ice Sevens swims around the world, governed and ratified by the International Ice Swimming Association
Pat Gallant-Charette swimming across the Tsugaru Channel starting at Tappi Misaki on an Oceans Seven channel attempt
Ion Lazarenco Tiron completed the Molokai Channel on Oahu in 18 hours 11 minutes in October 2016
Ion Lazarenco Tiron walking onshore on Sandy Beach on Oahu after his 18 hour 11 minute crossing of the Molokai Channel in October 2016
Oceans Seven certificate for Nora Toledano
Oceans Seven certificate for Mariel Hawley Dávila

noun - The Oceans Seven is the solo achievement of a crossing of seven channels around the world. It is open water swimming's version of the Seven Summits. The Seven Summits are the highest mountains in each of the seven continents, a mountaineering achievement.

Origin

The concept was first conceived and publicly proposed in June 2008 by Steven Munatones of the World Open Water Swimming Association.

Oceans Seven

The Oceans Seven consists of a solo unassisted crossing of the following waterways around the world:

North Channel 35 km between Northern Ireland and Scotland
Cook Strait 23 km between the North and South Islands of New Zealand
Molokai Channel 45 km between Oahu and Molokai Islands in Hawaii
English Channel 33.5 km between England and France
Catalina Channel 32.3 km between Catalina Island and the Southern California mainland
Tsugaru Channel 19.5 km between the islands of Honshu and Hokkaido in Japan
Strait of Gibraltar 14.4 km between Europe and Africa

History

To date, 21 humans in history have completed the Oceans Seven:
1. Stephen Redmond of Ireland
2. Anna Carin Nordin of Sweden
3. Michelle Macy of the U.S.A.
4. Darren Miller of the U.S.A.
5. Adam Walker of the UK
6. Kimberley Chambers of New Zealand
7. Antonio Argüelles of Mexico
8. Ion Lazarenco Tiron of Moldavia and Ireland
9. Rohan Dattatrey More of India
10. Abhejali Bernardová of the Czech Republic
11. Cameron Bellamy of South Africa
12. Lynton Mortensen of Australia
13. Thomas Pembroke of Australia
14. Nora Toledano Cadena of Mexico
15. Mariel Hawley Dávila of Mexico
16. André Wiersig of Germany
17. Elizabeth Fry (USA)
18. Attila Mányoki (Hungary)
19. Jonathan Ratcliffe (UK)
20. Jorge Crivilles Villanueva (Spain)
21. Adrian Sarchet (Guernsey)

Origin: Seven Summits

348 people have completed the Seven Summits and climbed Kilimanjaro (5,892m / 19,340 ft) in Africa, Vinson Massif (4,892 m / 16,050 ft) in Antarctica, either Kosciuszko (2,228m / 7,310 ft) or Carstensz Pyramid (4,884m / 16,024 ft) in Australia, Everest (8,848m / 29,035 ft) in Asia, Elbrus (5,642m / 18,510 ft) in Europe, Mount McKinley (6,194m / 20,320 ft) in North America, and Aconcagua (6,962m / 22,841 ft) in South America).

History of the Oceans Seven

The Oceans Seven was first proposed by Steven Munatones on 23 June 2008 based on the Seven Summits. Munatones thought the open water swimming community deserved an aquatic equivalent of the Seven Summits. A little more than 4 years later, Stephen Redmond became the first person to complete the Oceans Seven on 14 July 2012 with a 12 hour 45 minute crossing of the Tsugaru Channel.

Achieving the Oceans Seven requires an ability to swim in both very cold and very warm seas. It also demands the swimmer is physically and mentally prepared to overcome every condition known to defeat open water swimmers, from strong currents to stiff winds, from jellyfish to rough seas. Like its mountaineering cousin, the Oceans Seven requires a tremendous amount of planning, time, financial resources and multi-national support teams of knowledgeable local experts.

There is also one relay team that has completed all 7 channels in the Oceans Seven: Brian Ross, Chris Kraus and Rick Gaenzle in 2015.

Synonyms

Oceans Seven is also informally known as the Ocean's Seven or Ocean's 7 or Oceans 7 or 7 Oceans or el Desafío de los 7 Océanos; 7 Océanos or Siete Mares in Spanish.

Documentaries




Pamela K. Johnson made Wind & Waves about Antonio Argüelles' achievement of the Oceans Seven at the age of 58.

The Weather Channel - Top Ten: Extreme Adventures


about Darren Miller on his Oceans Seven journey

Oceans Seven, The Hell of North

Oceans Seven, The Hell of North is a documentary of Mányoki Attila's 12 hour 11 minute 20 second crossing of the North Channel when he completed the Oceans Seven, 18th person in history to do so.

Siete Mares

Siete Mares is the Spanish-language equivalent of the Oceans Seven including the following stretches of water:

Swims of the Oceans Seven

The distances listed are the shortest straight-line distances from point-to-point, but the actual distance covered by swimmers is significantly greater due to the tidal movements and currents.

1. North Channel
• Location: Channel between Northern Ireland and Scotland as defined by the Admiralty Chart 2198 North Channel Southern Part. It is also referred to as the Irish Channel.
• Reasons for Difficulty: Heavy seas, cold water, thunderstorms and strong currents are among the natural elements that must be overcome in the 35 km channel.
• Window of Opportunity: July through September.
• Hazards: Considered to be the most difficult channel swim in the world with the water temperature 54ºF (12ºC), normally overcast days, and tremendous difficulty in accurately predicting weather and water conditions. Swimmers face large pods of jellyfish if conditions are calm.
• Description: Has been attempted at least 73 times since 1924, but only 8 successful solo swims and 5 relays have been achieved to date. Most of the attempts have been abandoned due to difficult conditions and hypothermia.
• Additional Information: Swim crossings are governed by the rules set by the Irish Long Distance Swimming Association. First attempt was made in 1924 and the first success was 1947.
• Website: Irish Long Distance Swimming Association

2. Cook Strait
• Location: Channel between the North and South Islands of New Zealand.
• Reasons for Difficulty: 23 km across immense tidal flows in icy water conditions among jellyfish and sharks are extremely stiff challenges for only the most capable and adventurous swimmers.
• Window of Opportunity: November through May.
• Hazards: 1 in 6 swimmers encounter sharks on their crossings. Sharks only come around to be nosey. No one has ever been attached during a swim. Both sides of the strait have rock cliffs. Cold water (14ºC-19ºC or 57ºC-66ºF) over 26 kilometers and heavy chop.
• Additional Information: To date, only 71 successful crossings have been made by 61 individuals from 8 countries. Hypothermia and change in weather conditions during a race are the most common reasons attempts fail.
• Website: www.cookstraitswim.org

3. Molokai Channel (or the Kaiwi Channel)
• Location: Channel between the western coast of Molokai Island and the eastern coast of Oahu in Hawaii.
• Reasons for Difficulty: 45 km across a deep-water (701 meters) channel with extraordinarily strong currents in the middle of the Pacific Ocean and abundant marine life.
• Window of Opportunity: As conditions permit.
• Hazards: Extremely large rolling swells, strong winds and tropical heat and very warm salt water offset the incredibly beautiful views of the Hawaiian Islands and deep-blue underwater scenery.
• Additional Information: Deep-water channel with beautiful views of the Hawaiian Islands was first crossed in 1961 by Keo Nakama in 15 hours and 30 minutes and has only been crossed by 8 individuals to date.
Molokai Channel Swimming

4. English Channel (Channel Swimming & Piloting Federation or Channel Swimming Association)
• Location: Channel between England and France with the narrowest point being in the Strait of Dover between Shakespeare Beach, Dover, England and Calais, France.
• Reasons for Difficulty: An international waterway of 33.5 km at its narrowest point, cold water temperatures, strong currents and ever-shifting water and weather conditions.
• Window of Opportunity: June to September.
• Hazards: The world’s most famous channel crossing with nearly 1,000 successful swimmers to date, but thousands of failed attempts due to strong currents and tidal flows, strong winds and whitecaps caused by changing conditions and hypothermia.
• Additional Information: Considered to be the standard for channel crossing with the rules and traditions significantly influencing the worldwide open water swimming community.
• Websites: www.channelswimmingassociation.com and www.channelswimming.net

5. Catalina Channel
• Location: Channel between Santa Catalina Island and Southern California mainland, U.S.A. Formal name is the San Pedro Channel.
• Reasons for Difficulty: Cold water (especially near coast), strong currents, potential for strong winds, marine life and distance. Shortest point-to-point course is 32.3 km from Emerald Bay on Santa Catalina Island to the San Pedro Peninsula.
• Window of Opportunity: June to September.
• Hazards: A deep-water channel that is comparable to the English Channel in terms of water conditions, difficulty, distance and the physical and mental challenges to the swimmer, although the water temperature is a bit warmer (mid-60°F water). Marine life seen on occasion, including migrating whales and large pods of dolphins.
• Additional Information: First successful swim was in January, 1927 when Canadian George Young won $25,000 in the Wrigley Ocean Marathon Swim in 15 hours 44 minutes.
• Website: www.swimcatalina.org

6. Tsugaru Channel
• Location: Deep-water channel between Honshu, the main island of Japan where Tokyo is located, and Hokkaido, the northernmost island of Japan. Closest points are Tappi Misaki (竜飛岬) in Honshu and Shirakami Misaki (白神岬) in Hokkaido.
• Reasons for Difficulty: An international waterway, 19.5 km at its narrowest point. Swimmers must cross an extremely strong current between the Sea of Japan and the Pacific Ocean, large swells and abundant marine life ranging from sharks to deadly sea snakes. English and other western languages are not spoken in area. Water can be between 62–68ºF (16–20ºC). The most common course among successful swimmers is a 30 km course between Kodomari Cape on Honshu and Cape Shirakami on Hokkaido.
• Window of Opportunity: July and August.
• Hazards: Swimmers are swept long distances due to the extraordinarily strong currents flowing from the Sea of Japan to the Pacific Ocean. Swimmers face large blooms of squid during the night. Swimmers are challenged by occasional patches of cold water that flow up from the depths and are caused by the screws of the large oil tankers from the Middle East travel through to the West Coast of the U.S.
• Additional Information: Fewer than 20 confirmed solo crossings and two confirmed double-crossings have been achieved to date.
• Website: www.tsugaruchannelswimming.com

7. Strait of Gibraltar
• Location: Strait between Spain and Morocco that connects the Atlantic Ocean to the Mediterranean Sea. Shortest point is between Punta Oliveros in Spain and Punta Cires in Morocco.
• Reasons for Difficulty: 14.4 km across an eastern flow of water from the Atlantic Ocean to the Mediterranean Sea with an average of 3 knots (5.5 km per hour). Heavy boat traffic, logistical barriers and surface chop confront swimmers throughout each attempt.
• Window of Opportunity: June to October.
• Hazards: Its boundaries were known in antiquity as the Pillars of Hercules. The currents remain of Herculean strength. Combined with the unpredictability of the water conditions and high winds, only 185 successful one-way crossings and 7 double-crossings have been made to date.
• Additional Information: Most attempts are made from Tarifa Island due to the influence of strong currents, a distance of 18.5– 22 km (10– 12 miles).
Website: www.acneg.com

Oceans Second Seven

The Seven Second Summits is another mountaineering term that refers to the second-highest peak of each continent. What swims might be included in the Oceans Second Seven, open water swimming equivalent of the Second Seven Summits?

A very small number of candidate swims might include the Straits of Magellan in Chile, Skagerrak Strait between Norway, Sweden and Denmark, Cape Point and Cape of Good Hope both in South Africa, Lake Baikal in Russia, Beagle Channel between Argentina and Chile, Lake Titicaca from Bolivia to Peru, Gulf of Aqaba (or Eilat) between Egypt, Israel, Jordan and Saudi Arabia, Rottnest Channel in Australia, circumnavigation of Yonaguni Island in Okinawa near Taiwan, Loch Ness in Scotland, circumnavigation of Isle of Wight or the Jersey Island, Lake Tahoe between Nevada and California, U.S.A., Capri to Napoli in Italy, Majorca to Minorca, Spanish Balearic Islands, one of the crossings in the Santa Barbara Channel in California, U.S.A., crossing of the Five Lakes of Mount Fuji in Japan, Lake Balaton in Hungary or Lac St-Jean in Quebec, Canada, Jeble to Latakia in Syria, circumnavigation of Manhattan Island in New York City, U.S.A., or the Gulf of Toroneos in Greece…although there are innumerable other swims to be discussed, proposed and attempted, but there are many others.

Linguistic Note

The Oceans Seven is not linguistically correct as the swims do not cross oceans but channels.

Oceans Seven Swimmers

Stephen Redmond, Anna-Carin Nordin, Michelle Macy, Darren Miller, Adam Walker and Kimberley Chambers have completed the Oceans Seven to date. There are currently 174 athletes on the Oceans Seven Swimmers list. To update this list, contact Steven Munatones via headcoach@openwatersource.com.

COMPLETED
1st: Stephen Redmond (Ireland): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Catalina Channel, Cook Strait, Molokai Channel, Tsugaru Channel, North Channel
2nd: Anna-Carin Nordin (Sweden): Molokai Channel, English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Catalina Channel, Tsugaru Channel, Cook Strait, North Channel
3rd: Michelle Macy (USA): English Channel (3 times), Catalina Channel, Molokai Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Cook Strait, Tsugaru Channel, North Channel
4th: Darren Miller (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Molokai Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Tsugaru Channel, Cook Strait, North Channel
5th: Adam Walker (UK): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Molokai Channel, Catalina Channel, Tsugaru Channel, Cook Strait, North Channel
6th: Kimberley Chambers (New Zealand): Cook Strait, Molokai Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Catalina Channel, English Channel, Tsugaru Channel, North Channel
7th: Antonio Argüelles (Mexico): English Channel (2 times), Catalina Channel (4 times), Strait of Gibraltar, Tsugaru Channel, Molokai Channel, Cook Strait, North Channel
8th: Ion Lazarenco Tiron (Moldavia/Ireland): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, North Channel, Catalina Channel, Molokai Channel, Tsugaru Channel, Cook Strait
9th: Rohan Dattatrey More (India): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Molokai Channel, North Channel, Tsugaru Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Cook Strait
10th: Abhejali Bernardová (Czech Republic): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Catalina Channel, Tsugaru Channel, Molokai Channel, North Channel, Cook Strait
11th: Cameron Bellamy (South Africa): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Catalina Channel, North Channel, Molokai Channel, Cook Strait, Tsugaru Channel
12th: Lynton Mortensen (Australia): Strait of Gibraltar, English Channel, North Channel, Catalina Channel, Molokai Channel, Tsugaru Channel, Cook Strait
13th: Thomas Pembroke (Australia): English Channel (2 times), North Channel, Molokai Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Tsugaru Channel, Cook Strait
14th: Nora Toledano Cadena (Mexico): English Channel (6 times), Catalina Channel, Molokai Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Tsugaru Channel, North Channel, Cook Strait
15th: Mariel Hawley Davila (Mexico): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Molokai Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Tsugaru Channel, North Channel, Cook Strait
16th: André Wiersig (Germany): English Channel, Molokai Channel, North Channel, Catalina Channel, Tsugaru Channel, Cook Strait, Strait of Gibraltar
17th: Elizabeth Fry (USA): English Channel (6 times), Catalina Channel (2 times), Strait of Gibraltar, Molokai Channel, Tsugaru Channel, Cook Strait, North Channel
18th: Attila Mányoki (Hungary): English Channel, Tsugaru Channel, Molokai Channel, Catalina Channel, Cook Strait, Strait of Gibraltar, North Channel
19th: Jonathan Ratcliffe (UK): English Channel, North Channel, Molokai Channel, Tsugaru Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Catalina Channel, Cook Strait
20th: Jorge Crivilles Villanueva (Spain): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, North Channel, Molokai Channel, Tsugaru Channel, Cook Strait
21st: Adrian Sarchet (Guernsey): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, North Channel, Molokai Channel, Tsugaru Channel, Cook Strait

6 With 1 More To Go:
22. Penny Palfrey (Australia): English Channel (2 times), Strait of Gibraltar, Catalina Channel, Cook Strait, Molokai Channel, Tsugaru Channel
22. Stephen Junk (Australia): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Cook Strait, Catalina Channel, Tsugaru Channel, Molokai Channel
22. Pat Gallant-Charette (USA): English Channel (2 times), Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Tsugaru Channel, North Channel, Molokai Channel
22. Steve Walker (U.S.A.): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Catalina Channel, North Channel, Molokai Channel, Cook Strait
22. Dean Summers (Australia): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, North Channel, Molokai Channel, Cook Strait
22. Simon Olliver (Australia): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, North Channel, Cook Strait, Tsugaru Channel
22. Kieron Palframan (South Africa): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, North Channel, Tsugaru Channel, Cook Strait
22. Prabhat Koli (India): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, North Channel, Molokai Channel, Tsugaru Channel

5 With 2 More To Go:
30. Forrest Nelson (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel (both ways and two-way), Molokai Channel (both ways), Tsugaru Channel, Cook Strait
30. Craig Lenning (USA): North Channel, English Channel, Catalina Channel, Tsugaru Channel, Cook Strait
30. David Yudovin (USA): Catalina Channel (4 times), Strait of Gibraltar, Tsugaru Channel, English Channel, Cook Strait, [deceased]
30. Pieter Christian Jongeneel Anderica (Spain): Strait of Gibraltar (3 times), English Channel, Catalina Channel, Cook Strait, Molokai Channel
30. Marty Filipowski (Australia): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Cook Strait, Strait of Gibraltar, North Channel
30. Matthais Kabner (Germany): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, North Channel, Tsugaru Channel
30. John Zemaitis (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Molokai Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, North Channel
30. Joe Zemaitis (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Molokai Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, North Channel
30. Marty Filipowski (Australia): English Channel, Catalina Channel, North Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Cook Strait
30. Jim Barber (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Molokai Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Cook Strait

4 With 3 More To Go:
40. Taranath Narayan Shenoy (India): English Channel (3 times), Catalina Channel, Cook Strait, Strait of Gibraltar
40. James Pittar (Australia): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Cook Strait, Strait of Gibraltar
40. Kevin Murphy (England): English Channel (34 times), Catalina Channel, North Channel (2 times), Strait of Gibraltar
40. Bula Chowdhury Chakraborty (India): English Channel (twice), Catalina Channel, Cook Strait, Strait of Gibraltar
40. Tom Hecker (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Cook Strait, Strait of Gibraltar
40. T. Scott Coleman (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Cook Strait, Strait of Gibraltar
40. Kathleen Wilson (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Molokai Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
40. Lynne Cox (USA): English Channel (2 times), Catalina Channel (2 times), Cook Strait, Strait of Gibraltar
40. Aditya Santosh Raut (India): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Cook Strait, Strait of Gibraltar, [at the age of 16].
40. Yesenia Cabrera Fuegos (Guatemala): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Molokai Channel
40. Guy Moar (Australia): English Channel, North Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Tsugaru Channel
40. Oliver Wilkinson (England): English Channel, Molokai Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Catalina Channel
40. Anthony McCarley (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Cook Strait
40. Ryan Utsumi (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Tsugaru Channel, North Channel
40. Boguslaw Ogrodnik (Poland): Strait of Gibraltar, English Channel, Catalina Channel, Tsugaru Channel
40. Marcia Cleveland(USA): English ChannelCatalina Channel, North Channel, Tsugaru Channel

3 With 4 More To Go:
55. Beth French (Great Britain): English Channel, Molokai Channel (twice), Catalina Channel
55. Michael Miller (USA): Molokai Channel, English Channel (twice), Catalina Channel
55. Nick Adams (UK): English Channel (11 times), Strait of Gibraltar, Catalina Channel
55. Sakura Hingley (UK): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Catalina Channel
55. Jaimie Monahan (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
55. Alison Streeter MBE (UK): English Channel (43 times), North Channel (2 times), Catalina Channel
55. Barbara Held (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
55. Jaime Caballero Echeverría (Spain): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
55. Miquel Suñer Comalat (Spain): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
55. Samantha Simon (USA): English Channel (twice), Catalina Channel, Molokai Channel
55. David Blanke (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
55. Joseph Locke (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
55. Nial Funchion (USA): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Catalina Channel
55. Katie Benoit (USA/Germany): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Molokai Channel
55. James Penrose (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
55. Dan Richards (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
55. Ranie Crowley Pearce (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
55. Scott Lautman (USA): Strait of Gibraltar, Catalina Channel, English Channel
55. Michael Ventre (South Africa): English Channel, Molokai Channel, Catalina Channel
55. Florence Chadwick (USA): English Channel (3 times), Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, [deceased]
55. Roger Finch (South Africa): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
55. Helen Gibbs (UK): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Catalina Channel
55. Graeme Lowe (Jersey): English Channel, Catalina Channel, North Channel
55. Shubham Vanmali (India): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Catalina Channel
55. Dan Curtis (U.S.A.): Strait of Gibraltar (twice), Catalina Channel, Tsugaru Channel
55. Jeff Everett (U.S.A.): Strait of Gibraltar (2 times), English Channel, Catalina Channel
55. Tracy Clark (New Zealand): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Catalina Channel
55. Fionnuala Walsh (Ireland): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
55. Donald Perrott (South Africa): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Catalina Channel
55. Marcy MacDonald (U.S.A.): English Channel (15 times), Catalina Channel, Molokai Channel
55. Ned Denison (U.S.A.): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
55. Marilyn Korzekwa (Canada): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Cook Strait
55. Javier Mérida Prieto (Spain): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
55. Edward Williams (UK): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, North Channel
55. Robert Drysdale (UK): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Catalina Channel
55. Erica Moffett (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
55. Kevin Shinnick (USA): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Catalina Channel
55. Nathalie Pohl (Germany): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Catalina Channel
55. Nathan Payas (UK): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar (3 times), Catalina Channel
55. Toni Enderli (South Africa): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Molokai Channel
55. Julie Isbill (Australia): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Cook Strait
55. Milko van Gool (Netherlands): English Channel, North Channel, Catalina Channel
55. Kamil Resa Alsaran (Turkey): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Catalina Channel
55. Nathan Payas (Peru): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar (3 times)
55. Amy Appelhans Gubser (USA): Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, North Channel
55. Jenny Smith (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel, North Channel
55. Rachael Elkaim (Australia): English Channel, Catalina Channel, North Channel
55. Martyn Webster (Great Britain): English Channel (twice), Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
55. Paul Georgescu (Romania): English Channel, Catalina Channel, Tsugaru Channel

2 With 5 More To Go:
103. Doug McConnell (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Gabor Molnar (Hungary): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Carol Sing (USA) English Channel, Catalina Channel, [retired].
103. Nick Olmos-Lau (Mexico):English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Rebecca Jackman (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Andrew Hewitt (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. David Blanke (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Marcia Cleveland (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Bill Hoehn (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Sally Anne Minty-Gravett (Jersey Island, UK): English Channel (7 times), Catalina Channel
103. Scott Richards (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Andrew Alan Voisard (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Tina Neill (USA): English Channel (2 times including one backstroke), Catalina Channel (5 times including one backstroke)
103. Rendy Lynn Opdycke (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Michelle Davidson (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Nancy Steadman-Martin (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Elaine Kornbau Howley (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Stephen Autry (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Jeffrey Cleveland (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Mallory Mead (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Dave Barra (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel.
103. Tobey Saracino (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Michael Renford (Australia): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Mo Siegel (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Anthony Zamora (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. William Lee (Bahamas): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. James Fitzpatrick (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel (2 times)
103. Eddie Irwin (Ireland): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Selina Moreno Pasagali (Spain): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Hendrik Meerman (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Sarah Thomas (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel.
103. Dan Boyle (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Dave Smith (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Cindy Walsh (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Penny Dean (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel (double-crossing, 3 times), [retired].
103. Greta Andersen (Denmark/USA): English Channel (5 times), Catalina Channel (double-crossing), [retired].
103. Brad McVetta (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Susie Dods (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Vasanti Niemz (Germany): English Channel (2 times), Strait of Gibraltar
103. Colin Hill (Great Britain): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
103. Owen O'Keefe (Ireland): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
103. Abilio Couto (Brazil): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, [retired].
103. Patricio D'Ottavio (Argentina): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
103. Philip Rush (New Zealand): English Channel (3-way, 2-way, 10 times), Cook Strait (2-way twice, 8 times), [retired]
103. Miguel Arrobas (Portugal): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
103. Mercedes Gleitze (Great Britain): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, [deceased]
103. Henry Sullivan (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel, [deceased]
103. Christof Wandratsch (Germany): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
103. Jim McConica (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel (3 times)
103. Anna Wardley (Great Britain): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
103. Otto Thaning (South Africa): English Channel (2 times), Strait of Gibraltar
103. Laura Lopez Bonilla (Spain): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Carina Bruwer (South Africa): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
103. Colm O Neill (Ireland): English Channel, North Channel
103. Carol Lee Heltzel (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel, [retired].
103. Tom Blower (UK): English Channel (3 times) and North Channel, [deceased].
103. Miyuki Fujita (Japan): English Channel (8 times), Tsugaru Channel (4 times)
103. Sarah Thomas (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Kent Nicholas (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Henry Sullivan (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel, [deceased].
103. David Morgan (UK): English Channel, Catalina Channel, [retired].
103. Selina Moreno Pasagali (Spain): Strait of Gibraltar, Catalina Channel
103. Steven Black (England): Strait of Gibraltar and English Channel
103. Tara Diversi (Australia): English Channel and Strait of Gibraltar
103. Jason Zirganos (Greece): English Channel (four times) and Catalina Channel, [deceased after passing away in a North Channel attempt]
103. Bhakti Sharma (India): English Channel and Strait of Gibraltar
103. Cindy Walsh (USA): English Channel and Catalina Channel (twice)
103. Colleen Blair (Scotland): English Channel and North Channel
103. Geoff Wilson (Australia): English Channel and Catalina Channel
103. Robert Drysdale (UK): English Channel and Strait of Gibraltar
103. Paul Lewis (UK): English Channel and North Channel
103. C.P. Saravanavadivu (India): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
103. Balasaheb Ramchandra Ghadge (India): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
103. Steve Minaglia (U.S.A.): Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
103. John Walker (UK): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Jason Betley (UK): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
103. Pádraig Mallon (Ireland): English Channel, North Channel
103. John York (U.S.A.): English Channel, Catalina Channel (6 times), [retired].
103. Dr Mark Smitherman (U.S.A.): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. James Tout (U.S.A.): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Kristine Buckley (U.S.A.): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Mark Sheridan (UK): English Channel (2 times), Catalina Channel
103. David Cech (Czech Republic): English Channel (one-way and two-way), Strait of Gibraltar
103. Petr Mihola: English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
103. Richard Haan: English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
103. Zdenka Krčálová (Czech Republic): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Ritu Kedia (India): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
103. Lukasz Kowalczyk (Poland): North Channel, English Channel
103. Patti Bauernfeind (U.S.A.): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Howard James (England): North Channel, English Channel (3 times)
103. Shane Collins (Canada): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
103. Antonio Abertondo (Argentina): English Channel (5 times), Strait of Gibraltar
103. Keith Garry (Ireland): English Channel, North Channel
103. Caroline Block (USA): English Channel, North Channel (2 times)
103. Mickey Helps (UK): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
103. Eugene Hanrahan (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Dan Simonelli (USA): Catalina Channel (twice), English Channel
103. Dr. Tom Hackett (USA): English Channel, Molokai Channel
103. Jason Zirganos (Greece): English Channel (4 times), Catalina Channel (deceased)
103. Arlene Gonzalez (Mexico): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Emre Erdogan (Turkey): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
103. Danielle Wahl (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Jacques Tuset (France): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
103. Rachel Doyle (Ireland): English Channel, North Channel
103. Mark Blewitt (UK): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
103. Herman van der Westhuizen (South Africa): English Channel, North Channel
103. Christopher Smith (UK): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar (2 times)
103. Rebecca Nevitt: English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Clair Harris (UK): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Dan Abel (UK): English Channel, Cook Strait
103. Melissa Kegler (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Sophie Psilolignou (Greece): English Channel (twice), Strait of Gibraltar
103. Andrew McLaughlin (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Kate Robarts (UK): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Jesus Samuel Neri Gutierrez (Mexico): English Channel, Catalina Channel (6 times)
103. Imelda Lynch (Ireland): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
103. Zach Margolis (USA): Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
103. Tom Park (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Vicki Keith (Canada): English Channel, Catalina Channel, both butterfly
103. Antonio Abertondo (Argentina): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
103. David Čech (Czech Republic): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar (both two-way crossing)
103. Dan Simonelli (USA): English Channel, Catalina Channel (two times)
103. Keith Hancox (New Zealand): English Channel, Cook Strait
103. Meda McKenzie (New Zealand): English Channel, Cook Strait (4 times)
103. Elizabeth Horner (New Zealand): English Channel (2 times), Cook Strait (2 times)
103. Paul Feltoe (New Zealand): Cook Strait, Catalina Channel
103. Peter Dolnik (Slovakia): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Anna Strachan (Australia): English Channel, Molokai Channel
103. Eric Blakeley MBE (UK): English Channel, Strait of Gibraltar
103. Michael Teys (Australia): English Channel, Catalina Channel
103. Matías Ola (Argentina): Strait of Gibraltar, Catalina Channel
103. Erin O'Leary (USA): Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar

To update this list, contact Steven Munatones via headcoach@openwatersource.com

Relay Oceans Seven Members

COMPLETED:

3 With 4 More To Go:

2 With 5 More To Go:

To update this Relay Oceans Seven list, contact Steven Munatones via headcoach@openwatersource.com

Oceans Seven Youth Record

Thomas Pembroke of Australia became the youngest person to complete the Oceans Seven at the age of 29 years 10 months and 6 days when he crossed the Cook Strait on 14 December 2018. He crossed the Oceans Seven channels over a 5 year 4 month 30 day period at the following ages:

  • 24 years 5 months 7 days when he crossed the English Channel between England and France on 15 July 2013.
  • 26 years 7 months when he crossed the North Channel between Northern Ireland and Scotland on 8 September 2015.
  • 27 years 4 months 14 days when he crossed the Molokai Channel in Hawaii on 22 June 2106.
  • 27 years 4 months 21 days when he crossed the Catalina Channel in California on 29 June 2016.
  • 29 years 2 months 26 days when he crossed the Strait of Gibraltar between Spain and Morocco on 4 May 2018.
  • 29 years 6 months 2 days when he crossed the Tsugaru Channel in Japan on 10 August 2018.
  • 29 years 10 months 6 days when he crossed the Cook Strait in New Zealand on 14 December 2018.

Videos

Click here to watch the Oceans Seven on the Wall Street Journal.

Explorers: Adventures of the Century Trailer

Strait of Gibraltar Crossing


On 9 June 2019, André Wiersig completed a 14.4 km crossing of the Strait of Gibraltar in 4 hours 17 minutes, swimming between Spain and Morocco to complete the Oceans Seven. Video produced by Dennis Daletzki.

Tsugaru Channel Crossings


Video of Brad McVetta crossing the Tsugaru Channel from Honshu to Hokkaido in Japan, courtesy of Masayuki Moriya of Ocean-navi and the Tsugaru Channel Swimming Association


Video of Adam Walker crossing the Tsugaru Channel from Honshu to Hokkaido in Japan


Cameron Bellamy completing the Oceans Seven challenge with an 11 hour 7 minute crossing of the Tsugaru Channel on 20 June 2018.


Nora Toledano and Mariel Hawley completing a record-setting tandem swim across the Tsugaru Channel in 6 hours 20 minutes on 2 July 2018.

Cook Strait Crossing


Video of Adam Walker crossing the Cook Strait in New Zealand

Calendar Year Oceans Seven


Attempted by Beth French in 2016-2017

Sea Donkey Trailer


Documentary of Adrian Sarchet's crossing of the North Channel by James Harrison

Body, Mind, Soul Heroes In The Catalina Channel


A film by Lucas Rivet of La Fabrica Films and Asociación Argentina Gestión y Desarrollo del Deporte about Matías Ola and his Oceans Seven journey

Oldest Swimmers of the Oceans Seven Channels

As of September 2016, the oldest swimmers to have successfully crossed each of the Oceans Seven channels are as follows:

Cook Strait:

  • Tom Hecker (USA) age 60 in 10 hours 36 minutes from north to south in 2012
  • Toshio Ogawa (Japan) age 60 in 11 hours 51 minutes from south to north in 2015 [shown above]
  • Dr. Marilyn Korzekwa (Canada) age 58 in 11 hours 34 minutes from south to north in 2016

English Channel:

  • Dr. Otto Thaning (South Africa) age 73 years in 12 hours 52 minutes from England to France in 2014
  • Sue Oldham (Australia) age 65 in 17 hours 11 minutes from England to France in 2010

Tsugaru Channel:

Molokai Channel:

  • Mike Spalding (USA) age 60 in 15 hours 15 minutes from Molokai to Oahu in 2007
  • Linda Kaiser (USA) age 57 in 15 hours 0 minutes from Molokai to Oahu in 2007
  • Liz Fry (USA) age 57 in 17 hours 30 minutes from Molokai to Oahu in 2016

North Channel:

  • Graeme Lowe (Jersey) age 50 in 12 hours 27 minutes from Northern Ireland to Scotland in 2015
  • Fergal Somerville (Ireland) age 50 in 12 hours 21 minutes from Northern Ireland to Scotland in 2013
  • Pat Gallant-Charette (USA) age 65 in 14 hours 22 minutes from Northern Ireland to Scotland in 2016

Strait of Gibraltar:

  • Dr. Euler Konrad Paul Herbet (Germany) age 74 in 4 hours 9 minutes from Spain to Morocco in 2009
  • Carol Sing (USA) age 64 in 5 hours 27 minutes from Spain to Morocco in 2005

Catalina Channel:

  • Jim McConica (USA) age 64 in 10 hours 48 minutes from Catalina to the mainland in 2015
  • Pat Gallant-Charette (USA) age 60 in 14 hours 11 minutes from Catalina to the mainland in 2011

Ice Swimming

The Ice Sevens Challenge is the ice swimming equivalent of the Oceans Seven. To achieve the Ice Sevens, a swimmer must complete an Ice Mile in an open body of water under standard ice swimming rules (i.e., no wetsuit and no neoprene hat) under the auspices of the International Ice Swimming Association in the following locations.

o An Ice Mile swum below 5ºC (41ºF) in any location in Europe
o An Ice Mile swum below 5ºC (41ºF) in any location in Oceania
o An Ice Mile swum below 5ºC (41ºF) in any location in Asia
o An Ice Mile swum below 5ºC (41ºF) in any location in North America
o An Ice Mile swum below 5ºC (41ºF) in any location in Africa
o An Ice Mile swum below 5ºC (41ºF) in any location in South America
o An Ice Mile swum below 5ºC (41ºF) in any Polar location at 60º south or below or 70º north or above
o One of the seven Ice Miles must be a documented Zero Ice Mile (defined as a solo mile swim performed at below 1ºC

Ice Sevens

American ice swimmer Jaimie Monahan of New York completed the first documented Ice Sevens in history with the following Ice Miles:

1 in Europe on 2 April 2016 in Reykjavík, Iceland in 3.70°C water (3°C wind chill + 5.6°C air) in 35 minutes 0 seconds in the sea with 12 km/hr wind speed 2 in Asia (Ice Zero Mile) on 18 December 2016 in Tyumen, Russia in -0.03°C water (-31°C wind chill + air) in 30:20 in an ice pool cut into a frozen lake 3 in Africa on 13 February 2017 in Aguelmame Sidi Ali Lake, Morocco in 4.9°C water (-0.5°C wind chill + 3°C air) in 32:18 in a mountain lake with 14 km/hr wind speed 4 within Arctic Circle on 4 March 2017 in Mikkelvik Brygge, Karlsøy, Norway in 2.37°C water (-3.5°C air) in 32:09 in the sea with 4 km/hr wind speed 5 in North America on 9 March 2017 at M Street Beach, Boston, USA in 4.63°C water (6.1°C wind chill + 9°C air) in 26:16 in the sea with 20 km/hr wind speed 6 in Oceania on 15 May 2017 in Tasman Lake, Aoraki Mt. Cook, New Zealand in 2.37°C water (14°C air) in 26:44 in a glacier lake 7 in South America on 2 July 2017 in Ushuaia, Argentina in 4.76°C water (5.9°C air) in 29:05 in the Beagle Channel

Continents Seven

The Continents Seven is a series of 7 different, self-directed solo open water swims that is completed in all of the seven continents of Planet Earth either (1) within one year, or (2) over the course of one's career in the African continent, Asian continent, Antarctic continent, North American continent, European continent, Oceania and South American continent.

Circumnavigations Seven

The Circumnavigation Sevens is the achievement of 7 different, self-directed solo circumnavigation swims around seven islands anywhere of any distance on Planet Earth by a single individual.

Pioneering Oceans Seven

The Pioneering Oceans Seven is a version of the Oceans Seven. To achieve the Pioneering Oceans Seven, a swimmer must complete an unprecedented open water swim (i.e., a swim that has never attempted before) in any an open body of water under standard ice swimming rules (i.e., no wetsuit and no neoprene hat).

Oceans Grand Slam

The Oceans Grand Slam is a open water swimming solo challenge to complete the Oceans Seven in addition to completing a 1 km swim anywhere within the Arctic Circle and the Antarctic Circle in the Southern Ocean. The Oceans Grand Slam is open water swimming's equivalent of the Explorers Grand Slam or Adventurers Grand Slam (an adventurer's solo challenge to reach the North Pole, the South Pole and complete all of the mountaineering Seven Summits).

External links

Oceans Seven Channel Websites