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Le Château d’If

From Openwaterpedia
Le Château d’If is part of the Prison Island Swims (or the Triple Break or Triple Crown of Prison Island Swims that were nominated for the 2016 WOWSA Awards, a recognition of outstanding men, women, performances and offerings around the globe sponsored by the World Open Water Swimming Association in the category of World Open Water Swimming Offering of the Year
Jacques Tuset of France, the world's leading Prison Island Swims escapee

noun - Le Château d’If is a fortress and later a prison located on the island of If, the smallest island in the Frioul archipelago situated in the Mediterranean Sea about a mile offshore in the Bay of Marseille in southeastern France.

If Island[edit]

Île d’If is located 3.5 kilometers west of the Vieux Port in Marseille. The entire island is heavily fortified; high ramparts with gun platforms surmount the cliffs that rise steeply from the surrounding ocean. Apart from the fortress, the island is uninhabited.

Château[edit]

The fortress is a square, three-story building 28m long on each side, flanked by three towers with large gun embrasures. It was built in 1524-31 on the orders of King Francis I. The castle's principal military value was as a deterrent; it never had to fight off an actual attack.

Prison[edit]

The isolated location and dangerous offshore currents of the Château d'If made it an ideal escape-proof prison, very much like the island of Alcatraz in San Francisco, California was in more modern times. Its use as a dumping ground for political and religious detainees soon made it one of the most feared and notorious jails in France. The island became internationally famous in the 19th century when Alexandre Dumas used it as a setting for The Count of Monte Cristo, published to widespread acclaim in 1844. In the book, the main character Edmond Dantès (a commoner who later purchases the noble title of Count) and his mentor, Abbé Faria, were both imprisoned in it. After fourteen years, Dantès makes a daring escape from the castle, becoming the first person ever to do so and survive. In reality, no one is known to have done this.

The château's use as a prison ceased at the end of the 19th century. It was demilitarized and opened to the public in 1890. The Château d'If is listed as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture.

Open Water Swimming[edit]

10 Escapes Video[edit]


Courtesy of Jacques Tuset and Team Aquadeus

External links[edit]