Michelle Macy

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Michelle Macy
Men's team and women's team, including Steve Junk, Mark Cockroft, Dougal Hunt, Chris Palfrey, Stephen Spence, Julie Bradshaw, Michelle Macy, Barbara Pellick, Penny Palfrey, Lucy Roper, and Heather Osborn on Lake Taupo for the Taupo x 3 world record setting relay
Michelle Macy is one of the world's most accomplished marathon swimmers who began swimming at a young age and was a competitive swimmer through college. She was the third person in history to achieve the Oceans Seven.

She created the Still Water Eight and crossed the English Channel three times in 2007, 2009, and 2012. Her crossing of 10 hours 2 minutes in September 2007 was the fastest American swimming under a Channel Swimming Association sanction. She is a member of the Triple Crown of Open Water Swimming and a lifetime member of the Catalina Channel Swimming Federation. She completed the Manhattan Island Marathon Swim in 2008 in 7 hours 55 minutes and holds records in the North Channel between Ireland and Scotland, and the Anacapa Channel between Anacapa Island and the California mainland.

She was also nominated as the 2013 World Open Water Swimming Woman of the Year for her achievement of the Oceans Seven and her generous help of other open water swimmers.

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Contents

Oceans Seven

Macy was the third person in history to achieve the Oceans Seven and complete all seven of the world's major channels: English Channel (10 hours 2 minutes in 2007 and 11 hours 37 minutes in 2009), Catalina Channel (10 hours 12 minutes), North Channel (9 hours 34 minutes), Strait of Gibraltar (3 hours 39 minutes), Cook Strait (8 hours 2 minutes), Molokai Channel (14 hours 12 minutes), and the Tsugaru Channel (8 hours 55 minutes). When she completed the Oceans Seven with a crossing of the North Channel on 15 July 2013, she established a new world record from Ireland to Scotland in 9 hours 34 minutes.

2013 World Open Water Swimming Woman of the Year Nomination

Macy was nominated for the 2013 World Open Water Swimming Woman of the Year. Her nomination reads:

Her love of the sport knows no limits, she serves as support crew as readily as she dives in the water for her own marathon swims. Michelle Macy was the first American and third person overall to achieve the Oceans Seven. The full-time Nike employee takes enough time out of her busy work schedule to become one of the most prolific and accomplished open water swimmers in contemporary times. Without sponsors and without hype, the friendly, thoughtful, seriously-minded swimmer moves about the globe to cross channels and help others in their own quests. For her world record time across the North Channel, for her achievement of the Oceans Seven, for her joyful willingness to crew for other swimmers around the world, Michelle Macy is a worthy nominee for the 2013 World Open Water Swimming Woman of the Year.

Open Water Swim Experience

2006

Lake Minnetonka Challenge (5 miles) – Minnetonka, Minnesota
Pennock Island Challenge (8.2 miles) – Ketchikan, Alaska

2007

Alcatraz Sharkfest Swim (1.5 miles) – San Francisco, California
Pennock Island Challenge (8.2 miles) – Ketchikan, Alaska
English Channel (21 miles) – Dover, England in 10:02

2008

Manhattan Island Marathon Swim (28.5 miles) – New York City, New York
Boston Light Swim (8 miles) – Boston, Masschusetts
Pennock Island Challenge (8.2 miles) – Ketchikan, Alaska
Alcatraz Challenge (2 miles) – San Francisco, California
Catalina Channel (21 miles) – San Pedro, California

2009

Lake Taupo Triple Relay Crossing (120k) – Taupo, New Zealand
English Channel (21 miles) – Dover, England in 11:37
Pennock Island Challenge (8.2 miles) – Ketchikan, Alaska
Monterey Bay Relay swim (25 miles) – Santa Cruz, California

2010

Cook Strait (19 miles) – Wellington, New Zealand
Clarence Strait (14.5 miles) – Ketchikan, Alaska
Portland Bridge Swim (11 miles) – Portland, Oregon
Pennock Island Challenge (8.2 miles) – Ketchikan, Alaska
Monterey Bay Relay swim (25 miles) – Santa Cruz, California
Kaieiewaho Channel Relay (72 miles) – Oahu to Kauai, Hawaii

2011

EPIC 5 Challenge, 5 Ironmans, 5 Days, 5 Hawaiian Islands – Team Nike Relay, Hawaii
Strait of Gibraltar (12 miles) – Tarifa, Spain
PDX Bridge Swim (11 miles) – Portland, Oregon
Pennock Island Challenge (8.2 miles) – Ketchikan, Alaska
Karen Gaffney Columbia River Swim and Cruise for Kids (6 miles) – Portland, Oregon
Molokai Channel (26 miles) - from Molokai Island to Oahu Island, Hawaii

2012

Tsugaru Channel (38 km) - Honshu to Hokkaido, Japan
English Channel (21 miles) – Dover, England in 10:35

2013

North Channel (21 miles) - 9 hours 34 minutes (world record from Ireland to Scotland)
Anacapa Channel (12.2 miles) - 5 hours 29 minutes (world record for women from Anacapa to California mainland)
90 laps of the Willamette River in 11 hours 30 minutes in Portland, Oregon

English Channel Swim (2009)

Taupo x 3 Relay

Macy was a member of the Taupo x 3 relay, a three-way crossing of Lake Taupo by a 6-person male team and a 6-person female team of experienced open water swimmers in January 2009. The Taupo x 3 relay teams set a world lake swimming record by completing a 126 km (78.2 miles) triple-crossing of Lake Taupo, the largest lake in New Zealand under organisers Chris Palfrey, Penny Palfrey, and Julie Bradshaw. The swim started at 5:33 am on 5 January 2009.

The men's relay team finished in 33 hours 31 minutes 15 seconds and included Steve Junk (Australia), Mark Cockroft (New Zealand), Dougal Hunt (Australia), Chris Palfrey (Australia), and Stephen Spence (Australia) with New Zealand legend Philip Rush as the escort pilot. The women’s relay team finished in 33 hours 33 minutes 45 seconds and included Julie Bradshaw (England), Michelle Macy (USA), Barbara Pellick (Australia), Penny Palfrey (Australia), Lucy Roper (England), and Heather Osborn (New Zealand).

The plan was to start at first light from near Tokaanu, at the southern most point of the lake, heading roughly north east past Motutaiko Island, cutting close to Rangitiri point, before finishing on the beach in front of the Waikato River. The distance by GPS for one lap was 40.2 km. The second lap retraced the course back to the starting point and the final lap was a repeat of the first.

The men finished the first leg of 40.2 km in a time of 10 hours 22 minutes; the women finished in 10 hours 28 minutes. The men finished the second leg of 40.2 km in 12 hours 15 minutes; the women finished in 12 hours 19 minutes. The men finished the third leg of 40.2 km in 10 hours 54 minutes; the women finished in 10 hours 53 minutes. Both teams broke the world relay record set in December 2008 by 2 teams of 50 swimmers, each doing 2 km, who covered 100 km in 37 hours 6 minutes.

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